Many Ohioans are employed in the construction industry, which often involves working with or around electricity. It’s important to understand that construction workers who work near or around electricity face heightened risks of suffering electrocutions.

According to the National Fire Protection Association, a substantial number of construction worker electrocution deaths happened to contract workers who were either employed by other firms or were self-employed. Among contract workers who were killed on the job, 8 percent were electrocuted, and nearly 30 percent of the electrocution deaths happened at construction sites. Overall, construction trade workers accounted for 57 percent of electrocution deaths followed by electricians at 31 percent.

The NFPA states that while the use of contractors in the construction industry is common, companies need to make certain that these workers are properly trained. Staff may feel pressure to complete jobs according to tight project deadlines and also cut corners in an attempt to get done faster, potentially exposing them to higher electrocution risks. General contractors should avoid placing too many demands on contract workers or pressure them to produce too much in tight time periods.

When construction contract workers are killed while on a construction site, their families may have a couple of potential avenues of recovery. If the contract worker was working on the site for a third-party company, the decedent’s family may file a workers’ compensation claim with the employer. If the accident was caused by the negligence of the general contractor or the property owner, the worker’s family may be able to file a wrongful death lawsuit against the responsible parties. A construction accident lawyer may be able to identify all of the potential claims and liable parties.